Postcard

NOTE: This is a start to Prompt 86 posted in the Isolation Journal and suggested by my writing club member Pencil On My Back Porch. Prompted to choose 5 words (see full prompt below), I did choose 3 – postcard, clothesline, and popcorn around the theme of vacation but share just one here today.

First, four postcards are purchased from the art museum’s giftshop. Then, like a magician’s card trick, “Pick a card, any card” action allows each – dad, mom and two daughters – with card in hand, to begin the mystery game. The winner, the one who most spies with my little eye the painting on a wall matching the one depicted on the postcard. The prize, an extra scoop of ice cream for dessert.

These are the directions followed to keep the seven and eleven year olds engaged as the family of four tour the Prado Museum in Madrid. The day ahead will include so much walking, so many large paintings of anonomous people and places, so much staring. Yet the postcard game keeps all actively engaged.

“I found it! One down, three to go!” she shouted. And the four countinue down the corridor with the vaulted, enormous ceiling overhead. Sleuthing and appreciating art, playing the postcard game.

Isolation Journal DAY 86. JENNY BOULLY
When memories make themselves manifest, they alight like butterflies—fleeting, momentary, ineffable, seemingly uncapturable. The task of the writer then, having had the epiphany embedded within memory, is to relate not only the message from the dream embedded within the memory, but to also articulate, in language, that nebulous nature of the memory. How then do we encapsulate the memory in a way that also preserves its transitory nature?

Your prompt for today:
Pick five items from the list below.

popcorn * lettuce * iceberg * cotton candy * puffs * sugar cubes * dandelions * buttercups * pallbearer * clothesline * National Geographic * fire ants * watermelon * sunflowers * ticket stub * campfire * satellite * fish scales * baby powder * quilt * broach * barrette * tin can * bingo * Ferris wheel * frisbee * legumes * lima beans * caterpillar * earthworm * mockingbird * wagon * shaved ice * envelope * rotary phone * silk glove * single shoe * postcard * diner * cheese * houseplant * canoe * sharpened pencil * glue * lunch box
 

Then, write one memory associated with the item—or write associations you have of this item—in 200 words or less. Limit the use of “I.” Refrain from stating any emotions. Like dreamscapes, rely on images to convey feeling. Assemble these memory fragments into a collage-essay. Give it a one-word title.
Bonus: For the future, or to grow your memoir-fragments, you can make your own lists of random words, pick words at random from various books and dictionaries, or have friends generate lists.

4 thoughts on “Postcard

  1. sallydonnelly11 says:

    Yes! 20 years aago, we spend the month of August traveling in Spain as a family. Of course we wanted to tour museums but 7 and 11 year olds needed something to bribe them. They were used to going on fieldtrips to the National Gallery in DC and after the tour, we’d buy a $.50 postcard of a painting we saw and liked. I quickly invented this game – a reverse of what we did back home and the competition to win the extra scoop of ice cream kept all searching and searching! Fran introduced me to the Isolation Journal. Look for her post – she added all 5. I want to keep working on mine to make it a stronger collage. Check back next week!

    Like

  2. jumpofffindwings says:

    This was the prompt I planned to do today for my post, too, but I got side-tracked by a podcast! I love yours and can’t wait to try it. Now I want to visit the Prado. How clever of you to devise that postcard game—wow!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Fran McCrackin says:

    The postcard game is genius- I can’t wait until we can visit and travel and I will use it with my grandkids. I love these lines:

    “Then, like a magician’s card trick, “Pick a card, any card” action allows each – dad, mom and two daughters – with card in hand, to begin the mystery game.”

    “The day ahead will include so much walking, so many large paintings of anonomous people and places, so much staring.”

    These lines also show the contrast- the potential for boredom, exhaustion and whining, and the proactive countering it with magic and ice cream!!! Smart parents!

    Liked by 1 person

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