#28 I believe writing is both words and pictures!

At the beginning of the month, I was wondering about emoji. ( HERE and HERE).
A colleague didn’t think kids should use them when writing their kidblog posts. I listened and wondered.

This post that I read yesterday which was typed in ONLY emoji solidified my thinking. I believe writing is both words and pictures! Therefore,  think writing with emoji IS writing.

As I type this, I’m recalling how years ago, some librarians didn’t want graphic novels in their libraries. Again, I wondered. I took time to read one, Smile. I noticed as I read that not only was I enjoying a good story, I actually had to work harder to comprehend this story told mostly through pictures.

Yesterday I cooked a special birthday breakfast for my husband – German Apple Pancakes. I saw this recipe on facebook. It was want I call a video recipe. I had to watch and pause a few times to ensure I was including the right amount of each ingredient. But I loved watching how to combine the ingredients and how to cook it in the cast iron skillet in the oven. It turned out yummy! And I was able to cook it because I could read both words and pictures.

Next month, I am attended TCRWP 2nd Annual Digital and Media Institute. I’m not surprised at all that this literacy think tank now offers an institute devoted to figuring out ways to help teach reading and writing specific to our digital and media world.

From emoji to graphic novels to video recipes, as a reader and writer, I will continue to honor both words and pictures!! Because I believe writing is both words and pictures!

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5 thoughts on “#28 I believe writing is both words and pictures!

  1. Fran McCrackin says:

    First of all, I had missed Ann's emoji post- thanks for leading me to it in this piece. You (and she) are really stretching my ideas of writing. I agree with you, but you are ahead of the curve and I am definitely behind. Although I do get and appreciate graphic novels, and can remember the hesitation. Good for librarians- not so square after all- who used their budget for those expensive books and created teen-corners for kids to feel comfortable enjoying them.
    I eagerly await hearing what you have to say from your TI time coming up. Or should I say, hear and see.

    Like

  2. Fran McCrackin says:

    First of all, I had missed Ann's emoji post- thanks for leading me to it in this piece. You (and she) are really stretching my ideas of writing. I agree with you, but you are ahead of the curve and I am definitely behind. Although I do get and appreciate graphic novels, and can remember the hesitation. Good for librarians- not so square after all- who used their budget for those expensive books and created teen-corners for kids to feel comfortable enjoying them.
    I eagerly await hearing what you have to say from your TI time coming up. Or should I say, hear and see.

    Like

  3. sroeck says:

    I agree! So many of preteen chapter books have a few pictures(emojicon-like). The students tend to gravitate toward them and I can see why. I am amused by these drawings as a 42 year old so I can see how they would be.

    Like

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